In the Aftermath of Khrushchev’s Rule
30 June, 2011

Following his resignation, three persons – Brezhnev, Kosygin Suslov took power in their hands.

Two of them will go down in history as terrible haters of the Georgian people. Professor Simon Maskharashvili has more. 

 

SM – I totally agree with you. He lost prestige and authority not only in the eyes of the West, but among the communist party elite too, even with the families of the repressed people. As you know, Stalin’s image was white-washed by the results of the Second World War. The anti-Khrushchev movement began in the country. The party elite decided to get rid of him. In 1957, Molotov, Bulganin, Kaganovich and Malenkov called the presidium (politburo) meeting which declared Khrushchev’s resignation, but look, they could not operate like Stalin. In Stalin’s time, the ‘culprit’ was eliminated right on the spot – in the offices of communist ladders. Khrushchev was offered the post of the minister of agriculture or the honorable retirement, but the younger members of the presidium (among them, Leonid Brezhnev, future secretary general of the communist party) said that the presidium was not authorized to fire the party secretary because party secretaries were elected by the central committee of the communist party. And they were right by the way. They raised the question of convening the central committee plenary meeting. The then defense minister Zhukov played a significant role at that historic moment.

GJ – What did he do in particular?

SM – He instructed every military region to immediately find the members of the USSR communist party central committees, scattered around Soviet republics, regions and cities by means of using their military power of operative action, to put them on the plane and to bring them to Moscow without any delay. Indeed, in the shortest possible time the central committee was in session, and Comrades Molotov, Bulganin, Kaganovich and Malenkov found themselves in minority. Nikita Khrushchev remained the secretary of the central committee, and Stalin’s old friends and comrades-in-arms were soon expelled from the party, confining them to home-arrest. Starting from 1957, Khrushchev was relying on the younger party cadre – former Comsomol (Young Communist League members) members. Those were the party members who Stalin had chosen for promotion right before his death: Suslov, Brezhnev and Kosygin substituted those party strongmen in the presidium (politburo) who had recently been ousted.  In 1961, the decision was made to throw out Stalin’s corpse from the mausoleum in the Moscow red Square. In 1964, Khrushchev was made victim of the so called ‘black’ PR. The newspapers ran phony articles, containing the facts of praising Stalin by Churchill and recognition of Stalin’s greatness by other Western leaders while Khrushchev severely criticized and denounced this great genius. One day when Khrushchev was spending his holidays in Gagra of Apkhazeti he was completely isolated. He was shut out from any contact with the military. The Georgian KGB chief Alexi Inauri played a crucial role in the operation. The urgent meeting of the central committee of the communist party was convened in Moscow. Khrushchev was flown to Moscow and the plenary meeting of the central committee declared his resignation. Following his resignation, three persons – Brezhnev, Kosygin Suslov took power in their hands.

GJ – Two of them will go down in history as terrible haters of the Georgian people . . .